Portraits From Greece as It Endures a Crisis -- and as It Perseveres

Last week, The New York Times published a small collection of portraits of Greeks and their thoughts on the current economic crisis:

The country is no stranger to unrest. As the weak link in the 19-nation eurozone, it is struggling to repay billions in debt. If Greece goes bankrupt or decides to leave the eurozone, the situation could have a profound effect on its citizens and reverberate around the globe. Here is a glimpse into the lives of some Greeks, from residents of a small island to those in the country’s capital. 
 

Photo: EIRINI VOURLOUMIS

Photo: EIRINI VOURLOUMIS

"I honestly don’t miss the previous ‘fatter’ years so much, with the emphasis on cronyism and consumerism. Things are much more interesting now. My biggest fear for the future is that the fate of European citizens will continue to be shaped by financial and political forces that have absolutely no concern for our welfare."

- John Consolas, Innkeeper, 36

Mr. Consolas, who is of Greek-Irish heritage, thinks the crisis has had at least one positive impact: "It has forced young Greeks to think hard about what they want to do with their lives." 

This portrait particularly resonates with ANGELIKI's mission to create a platform for young Greeks who have discovered ways they can work and preserve their cultural identity through design, art and craftsmanship.

Here are our portraits of the artisans we work with in Greece:

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AC

I grew up in Austin, Texas where I was first introduced to the colors of Mexican interiors and spent my summers in Greece where my yiayia taught me the holy trinity of Greek cooking: lemons, olive oil, and salt. After studying photography and environmental policy at Sewanee: The University of the South I earned my B.A. in 2009 and moved to Washington, DC to work on political and public advocacy campaigns for The Nature Conservancy where I learned about message development, strategic planning, and feasibility research. In 2014, after the birth of my daughter and in an effort to strengthen my Greek ties and resurrect my photography I launched an e-shop called, ANGELIKI, where I share my hand-picked selection of my favorite Greek designs.

My love for fonts, film, and finesse has always remained true throughout this journey. Today, I live in Atlanta, Georgia and and work full-time as a mother, photographer, website publisher and shop curator